Empathic Parenting Support and Education Group begins April 9

Would you like to…

• Understand your child’s behavior in new and deeper ways
• Learn about attachment and how this impacts our relationships with our kids
• Know how taking care of yourself is actually an incredible service to your child
• See the ways your child triggers the parts of you that are in need of healing
• Shift what you focus on in your child, so that her strengths become the foreground of your interactions
• Meet, share stories and get invaluable support from fellow parents and caretakers

Join me for an 8-week group and experience for parents who want to increase empathy, understand their children and show up more fully in relationships with their kids and beyond.

When: April 9=May 28, Monday evenings 7=8:30 pm
We will meet for eight sessions with the possibility of continuing on.

Where: 2346 Broadway St., Boulder 80304 (between Mapleton and High)

Cost: $150 per person, $250 per couple

Parents who may need to miss some weeks may also pay a fee of $20 per session. Attendance at first session is highly encouraged.

How to join: Contact Sanam at 303-717-1749 or sanam@play-to-heal.com

“Sanam’s Empathetic Parenting Support and Education group created a nuturing and compassionate enviornment in which parents could process the challenges and joys of parenting.  Also, Sanam’s warm presence helped provide the space and safety in which each parent could open to their own inner work to allow the opportunity for us to be more authentic and fully present as parents. I would highly recommend this group to any parent who would like to deepen their understanding and acceptance of their child(ren), as well as themselves.”        ~Khristine R. (group veteran)

Sanam Pejuhesh, MA is a play therapist and psychotherapist in Boulder with over 20 years of experience working with children and families. She works with kids (3-11), families and adult individuals, believing that with compassion and connection, all humans (young and old) can access their innate capacity for healing and growth.

Thanksgiving Gratitude

 

If the only prayer you said in your whole life was, “thank you,” that would suffice. – Meister Eckhart

On this weekend before Thanksgiving, I’m giving a lot of thought to the concept of gratitude and thinking of all the things that I am truly grateful for. And I’m thinking of the ways we can convey this concept to young children, who are by nature egocentric beings. It is our role to help kids cultivate and experience feelings of thanks and gratitude, which are so important in allowing them to feel empathy and concern for the well-being of others. So how do we do this?

First and foremost: By modelling and expressing our own open-hearted thanks, not just on one day of the year, but every day. Create a daily ritual where we name something that we are thankful for. Dinner is an amazing opportunity to do this and it can give way to some rich table time conversations. Bedtime is another opportunity, leaving children to drift off to sleep with thoughts of blessings and grace. It’s ok if they name material things that they are grateful for. You can model your sense of thanks for things like generosity, kindness, patience, etc. Kids will pick up on this and eventually express it themselves.

Let children know all the ways you feel grateful throughout the day. “I am so lucky to have such helpful kids.” “I’m really grateful to our neighbor for feeding the kitty while we were gone this weekend.”

Thank your kids for the ways they help out…and be specific. “Thank you for putting your shoes in your room the first time mommy asked you to. It was really helpful and felt good to have to ask only once.” And remind them to thank each other. “Did you say thank you to Henry for sharing his blocks with you? That was really kind of him.”

Demonstrate the spirit of helping others. You can keep it simple…Take the trash out or shovel snow for an elderly neighbor. Or take it to the next level…Have them pick out old toys, clothes or books to donate to a shelter or organization. Participate in a food drive. Volunteer as a family baking cookies or a meal for children who are hospitalized. And use these deeds as opportunities to talk about all that we are fortunate to have–from food and a warm home to our precious bodies.

The thing to remember is that young children are egocentric beings–they see and experience the world through their own eyes. And gratitude is not a trait that comes naturally to them–it is learned through positive experiences and reinforcement. So give gentle reminders and lots of reinforcement, but be patient. Children don’t genuinely integrate ways of being when they are forced. Cultivating an authentic sense of gratitude takes time but will have tremendous rewards for both you and your children.

Happy Thanksgiving and many blessings.